something compelling about the prospect of the world’s weirdos and artists and everyone else looking elsewhere for their utopia

Posted: June 4th, 2015 | No Comments »

cordjefferson:

I’m a single guy who makes good money and moved here from out of state to take a cheap apartment in a traditionally Polish neighborhood, so I feel pretty bad even having this conversation, because I’m a big part of the problem. I’m not anywhere near a working-class family being forced to commute to minimum-wage jobs in Manhattan from an apartment farther and farther away because they keep getting priced out. (Note to someone: The next book of essays about people leaving New York should be written by poor people forced to leave instead of those of us who did it for quarter-life-crisis or career or significant-other reasons). That being said, where people from our backgrounds are concerned, I don’t think New York’s transformation is such a bad thing. I actually find something compelling about the prospect of the world’s weirdos and artists and everyone else looking elsewhere for their utopia. I hope I do leave here someday. And if I have grandkids, I hope they say to me, “We can’t believe you ever thought New York City was cool,” while pushing my wheelchair through their anarchist arts commune in Orlando.

(via durgapolashi)

think about this a lot, since i live in a manhattan-ish utopia-ish kinda place, and i can’t always put my finger on why this place is so special (besides the obvious reasons of small town living/big city culture/incredible stars, incredible sunsets). but really, why couldn’t a random city somewhere else be heavenly? if you had the space and liked the scenery and could find the people…it probably could be. it’s almost more exciting to carve your niche, than to live in a niche.



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